Wednesday Webs: The Gales of November

turkeys

November is well upon us. What is it they say, the gales of November? I think of this on my morning walks when the air feels dark and the wind has sharpened. On a cozier note, November also initiates the season of togetherness. We tuck ourselves in, light a fire, and begin planning for the holidays.

Wednesday Webs: Oh, Beautiful October!

pumpkins and squash

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”
L.M. MontgomeryAnne of Green Gables

Happy first day of October! Can a month be more glorious than this? I think not. I love seeing the daily changes of color, hearing songs of sandhill cranes as they roost in greater numbers, and feeling a satisfied sense of harvest goodness.

  • In Holidays and Holy Nights, Christopher Hill explains that autumn is actually the beginning of the cycle for Christians who observe the liturgical year.
  • Autumn is a season of letting go, including the confines of a defined office. These days you can work from anywhere!
  • Thinking of letting go of the old job and going out on your own? Check out these Freelance FAQs.
  • Last week was the Autumnal Equinox. In an effort to live more rhythmically with God’s natural creation, I’m interested in harvesting by the phases of the moon.
  • Come winter, California’s difficult times will affect all of us. Worse yet, there is no amicable solution.
  • I’ve been wanting to try making homemade granola.
  • Or this pumpkin chili.

Enjoy October! It’s such a gift!

Wednesday Webs: A Great Rural Art Project to Support

Indiegogo project by Fermentation Fest and Shimon & Lindemann

I’ve been enamored by Shimon & Lindemann since I saw them years ago in their Unmasked & Anonymous exhibit at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Once, I even suckered my husband into helping me emulate them for a photography class assignment, which involved him sitting in a rocking chair outdoors in the middle of winter. So when Donna, of Wormfarm Institute, asked me to help promote the project they’re doing together, I was happy to jump on the wagon. The bandshell wagon, that is.

Harvestore Bandshell

According to their Indiegogo page, “Artists John Shimon and Julie Lindemann designed the Harvestore Bandshell as both an homage to Wisconsin’s agricultural history and as a unique and mobile performance venue.” This half-a-historic-Harvestore-silo stage will showcase poets, musicians and drama performances at the 2104 Fermentation Fest, a 9-day festival of art, agriculture and fermented food in Sauk County, Wisconsin.

In case you’re wondering, Indiegogo is one of those super, people-minded crowd funding organizations that enable even the little guys to pursue their greater purposes. Perhaps you might consider contributing to this very cool project?

Anyway, I know I’ve been orating endlessly on the Fermentation Fest (when I take on a project I give it my all, including in-your-face, excessive promotion of my client!). I’ve talked about the food, but have I mentioned there’s art? One of the highlights of Fermentation Fest is the 50-mile, self-guided tour—DTour, as it’s been branded—through the rolling farmlands of Sauk County. But it’s not just farmlands. There’s art. Like 3-D art installations in the middle of hayfields. And performances—Pasture Performances—in, yes, animal pastures. And artisan food stands in the middle of nowhere.

This week my list of Wednesday Webs is a sampling of art in Sauk County, either during Fermenation Fest or any other time. You’ve got to come and see!

Pasture Performances at Fermentation Fest:

Sauk County Art Attractions

Wednesday Webs: An Artful List to Enrich Your Life

Kandinsky This week I had the opportunity to see Kandinsky: A Retrospective at the Milwaukee Art Museum. I’ve always been drawn to this modernist’s colorful boldness and the exhibit was a super representation of his work—130 pieces, to be exact. Interestingly, the exhibit ranged from Kandisky’s early years of self-discovery, including Impressionism and Art Nouveau (my favorite); to the bold abstractions we normally associate with him; to his final watercolor works in the 1930-40s.

I love the Milwaukee Art Museum with all its splendor of art and architecture. But lately I’m giving nod to a less formal presentation of art—rural art. It’s one I really appreciate simply because for the past 2-3 months it’s all I’ve been working with.

Fermentation Fest's Rural Art
Not that I’ve mentioned it at all (cough), but my recent project has been an event guide for the upcoming Fermentation Fest. Okay, I admit I’ve been a bit obsessed with it. It’s food. It’s art. It’s two of my great loves—an exciting event you simply must check out!

Anyway, in doing this project I’ve become aware of many organizations that greatly enrich our lives.

Here they are:

  • Art of the Rural is an group of rural Americans working to promote rural arts and culture. Every other year it sponsors Year of the Rural Arts and 2014 is one of those years!
  • Looking for a grant? To date, ArtPlace America has given $56.8 million in support of the arts, including several grants to Fermentation Fest’s very own Sauk County, Wis.
  • If you watch even a little PBS television, you’ve heard of the National Endowment for the Arts. This federal agency also provided funding for the Fermentation Fest.
  • Wisconsin Arts Board, another supporter of Fermentation Fest, has a great list of Wisconsin art tours.
  • Arts Wisconsin regularly posts cool artsy happenings and news on its Facebook page (bringing much more positivity to my day than political posts).
  • The Wormfarm Institute started out as a farm (but not a worm farm) and is now a non-profit working to integrate agriculture and culture. It’s currently accepting applications for its artist residency program.

Wednesday Webs: Newspaper Nameplates


 

Newspaper nameplate design by Adunate

I’ve been researching newspaper nameplates for an upcoming project. Sometimes people refer to these as mastheads, but technically, in newspaper design the masthead is a section that lists the name of the publisher, contact information and subscription rates. Whatever. The top banner of the newspaper is what I’m working on. And here’s what I’ve run across in my research:

  • Ever wonder why newspaper mastheads were always done in Gothics? According to Font Factory, these typefaces embody the longstanding credibility newspapers wish to convey.
  • This instructor’s site takes me back to my college days. One of my favorite journalism classes: Newspaper Design.
  • Newspapers aren’t dead. Here are trends in news design.
  • When it comes to inspiration, nothing beats Pinterest!